Purchase

Price: $120 (CAD)

Info

Style: Self paced

Duration: 15 units

Completion

The following certificates are awarded when the class is completed:

  • WeeHands Class Completion Certificate

Early Communication Skills

Early Communication Skills

For parents of young children who have not yet begun to talk or who communicate in one-word utterances.

An online self-paced home program for parents that Introduces and teaches 15 activities for the young child who has not yet begun to talk or who communicates in one-word utterances (using speech or sign language). Activities (which include signed songs, videos, worksheets and games to play at home) help develop a desire to communicate, encourage turn-taking and emerging vocabulary.

The Early Communication Home Program for parents uses a Total Communication approach...encouraging the use of American Sign Language (ASL) signs, pictures and speech. The Early Communication Home Program helps parents to improve their children's emerging vocabulary, language and turn-taking skills.

Each unit will include specific language goals for parents, a list of inexpensive materials for the unit's activity, as well as signed songs and stories to use daily with your wee one to encourage that unit's language goals.

Parent participants in the Early Communication Home Program will learn:

- a minimum of 120 functional & motivating American Sign Language signs to use with their children
- a minimum of 15 engaging and fun songs to sign & sing at home
- to create "teachable moments" from everyday routines
- to provide structured learning opportunities in natural environments by using their child's interests and natural motivation

One-on-one coaching and support from WeeHands founder, Sara Bingham (Communicative Disorders Assistant) will be available for all participating families via chats, email and Skype.

Part 1: Course Information

Instructor Information

Instructor: Sara Bingham

Telephone: 905-922-9052

E-mail: info@weehands.com 

Course Description

This 15 unit home program for parents introduces and teaches 15 activities for the young child who has not yet begun to talk or who communicates in one-word utterances (using speech or sign language). Activities (which include signed songs, videos, worksheets and games to play at home) help develop a desire to communicate, encourage turn-taking and emerging vocabulary.

The Early Communication Skills Home Program for parents uses a Total Communication approach...encouraging the use of American Sign Language (ASL) signs, pictures and speech. The Early Communication Home Program helps parents to improve their children's emerging vocabulary, language and turn-taking skills.

If you'd like an information sheet about the program to share with your pediatrician and early intervention team, just click here

Prerequisite: not applicable

Textbook & Course Materials

Required Text

not applicable

Recommended Texts & Other Readings

The Baby Signing Book: Includes 450 ASL Signs for Babies and Toddlers

Course Requirements

  • Internet connection (DSL, LAN, or cable connection desirable)
  • Access to http://weehands.edu20.com

Course Structure

This course will be delivered entirely online through the course management system at http://weehands.edu20.com. To access this course on you will need access to the Internet and a supported Web browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari). You will use your account to login to the course from the WeeHands login page.

Participants will access online lessons, course materials, and resources. Activities will consist of chat and discussion forums.

Technical Assistance

If you need technical assistance at any time during the course or to report a problem with WeeHands you can:

Important Note:

This syllabus, along with course assignments and due dates, are subject to change. It is the participant’s responsibility to check the online course site for corrections or updates to the syllabus. Any changes will be clearly noted in course “news”..

Part 2: Course Objectives

Participants will learn:

  • the difference between speech, language and communication
  • to follow their child’s lead
  • to encourage their child to initiate conversations
  • to be more comfortable signing and singing songs with their child
  • over 120 child-appropriate American Sign Language signs
  • to provides choicesto encourage turn-taking
  • to provide opportunities for their child to communicate
  • to expand on their child’s words and ideas
  • to ask open ended questionsto share books together

You will meet the objectives listed above through a combination of the following activities in this course:

  • through participation
  • homework assignments with their child
  • online discussions and chats

Part 3: Topic Outline/Schedule

Important Note: Activities will be explained in detail within each unit's corresponding learning module. If you have any questions, please contact your instructor.

Unit 1 - Rolling! Rolling!

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to encourage their child to take turns

Unit 2 - Peek-A-Boo

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic.
    • to encourage their child to take turns
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to encourage joint or shared attention with their child

Unit 3 - Water Play

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to encourage emerging vocabulary related to opposites

Unit 4 - Great Big Bubbles!

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to introduce vocabulary related to action words

Unit 5 - Blocks Away!

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to encourage their child to take turns

Unit 6 - Balloon Play

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to provide motivating opportunities to communicate
    • to follow their child’s lead

Unit 7 - Up, Up & Away

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to provide motivation for communication

Unit 8 - Mirror, Mirror

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to encourage imitation skills
    • to introduce and encourage the use of vocabulary related to body parts.

Unit 9 - Playing with Puzzles

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to encourage choice making
    • to encourage increased eye contact

Unit 10 - Family Photos

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to encourage emerging vocabulary related to familiar people and items
    • to encourage early matching skills

Unit 11 - Beanbag Toss

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to encourage emerging color vocabulary
    • to encourage early counting skills

Unit 12 - Surprise! Surprise!

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to encourage labelling and commenting
    • to encourage early descriptive vocabulary

Unit 13 - Play Dough

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to encourage vocabulary related to action words

Unit 14 - Rice Tub

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to encourage imitation skills
    • to encourage emerging vocabulary

Unit 15 - Playground Trip

  • Participants will learn:
    • a minimum of eight (8) American Sign Language signs related to the unit’s topic
    • to sign and sing a song related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to share books related to the unit’s topic with their child
    • to provide motivating opportunities to communicate
    • to follow their child’s lead

Participation

Participants are expected and encouraged to share and participate in all online activities as listed and encouraged in each unit.

References

  • Bekkering, H., & Wohlschlager, A. (2000). Imitation of gestures in children is goal-directed. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 53A-1, pp 153-164.
  • Caskey, M., Stephens, B., Tucker, R., & Vohr, B. (2011). Importance of Parent Talk on the Development of Preterm Infant Vocalizations. Pediatrics, 128(5), 910-916. doi:10.1542/peds.2011-0609
  • Drew, A., Baird, G., Baron-Cohen, S., Cox, A., Slonims, V., Wheelwright, S., & ... Charman, T. (2002). A pilot randomised control trial of a parent training intervention for pre-school children with autism: Preliminary findings and methodological challenges. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 11(6), 266.
  • Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). (2004). Retrieved January 12, 2013, from http://idea.ed.gov
  • Ingersoll, B., & Gergans, S. (2006). The effect of a parent-implemented imitation intervention on spontaneous imitation skills in young children with autism. Research in Developmental Disabilitie. Portland, OR: Elsevier Ltd.
  • Jacqueline W., W., & Tristram, S. (2003). Generalization between receptive and expressive language in young children with autism (This manuscript is based on research conducted for the first author's doctoral dissertation. Preparation of the manuscript was supported in part by NIMH Grant R01.. Behavioral Interventions, 18(4), 245.
  • Jolivette, Peck Stichter, J., K., Ridgley, R., Scott, T., & Sibilsky, S. (2002). Naturally occurring opportunities for preschool children with or without disabilities to make choices. Education and Treatment of Children, 25-4, 396-414.
  • Justice, L.M., Weber, S.E., Ezell, H.K., & Bakeman, R. (2002). A sequential analysis of children's responsiveness to parental print references during shared book-reading interactions. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 11, 30-40.
  • Kasari, C., Freeman, S., & Paparella, T. (2006). Joint attention and symbolic play in young children with autism: a randomized controlled intervention study. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 47:6, pp 611–620.
  • Lerman, D. C., Parten, M., Addison, L. R., Vorndran, C. M., Volkert, V. M., & Kodak, T. (2005). A Methodology For Assessing The Functions Of Emerging Speech In Children With Developmental Disabilities. Journal Of Applied Behavior Analysis, 38(3), 303-316. doi:10.1901/jaba.2005.106-04
  • Mossabeb, R., Wade, K. C., Finnegan, K., Sivieri, E., & Abbasi, S. (2012). Language Development Survey Provides a Useful Screening Tool for Language Delay in Preterm Infants. Clinical Pediatrics, 51(7), 638-644. doi:10.1177/0009922812439244
  • Romski, M., & Sevcik, R.A., (2005). Augmentative communication and early intervention: Myths and realities. Infants & Young Children, 18(3), 174-185.
  • Suttora, C., & Salerni, N. (2011). Maternal speech to preterm infants during the first 2 years of life: stability and change. International Journal Of Language & Communication Disorders, 46(4), 464-472. doi:10.1111/j.1460-6984.2011.00007.x
  • Suttora, C., & Salerni, N. (2012). Gestural development and its relation to language acquisition in very preterm children. Infant Behavior & Development, 35(3), 429-438. doi:10.1016/j.infbeh.2012.02.008